Home & Garden / News

A Visit to Cold Antler Farm

In early July, I scheduled a one-woman Roost field trip to visit one-woman farmer-homesteader-archer Jenna Woginrich at Cold Antler Farm. On paper, the excuse to travel was so we could hole up at a café near her farm and edit her manuscript for a couple of hours over iced chais and tomato sandwiches. But my heart’s real intention was to have a summer day on the farm: meet the horses, dig my fingers into the sheep’s wooly coats, sweet talk the turkeys, and deepen my undying love for goats.

Cold Antler delivered on all.

The hillside of Jenna’s six-and-a-half acres is lush and vibrant in high summer.

Gibson, the delightfully friendly and devoted Border Collie, guards a fleet of chicks in a moveable cage. The speckled brown birds are wild turkey poults whose mama had been sadly hit by a car near the farm. A friend rescued them and Jenna is raising them alongside the chicks.

 

Dear Ida: if Ian Falconer had met you ages ago, he might have reconsidered the name Olivia. How can you resist this sweet little mug?

Jenna took me out for a spin along the gorgeous country roads in her cart with Merlin, one of her two horses. Being at Cold Antler felt like a throwback; there may have been an electric fence, Wi-Fi, and a bread machine in the kitchen, but you can’t help but feel blissfully unplugged.

Jenna took me out for a spin along the gorgeous country roads in her cart with Merlin, one of her two horses. Being at Cold Antler felt like a throwback; there may have been an electric fence, Wi-Fi, and a bread machine in the kitchen, but you can’t help but feel blissfully unplugged.

Running a small homestead solo is hard work that tethers you to the land, literally. After about three hours in downtown Cambridge, New York, it was time for us to scoot back to the farm so Jenna could tend to the animals. In addition to her busy farming, writing, and blogging, Jenna hosts programs and tutorials year-round on old-timey homesteading skills like spinning and fiddling.

Jenna’s new collection of essays, Cold Antler Farm, will be published by Roost Books next spring. In Cold Antler Farm, Jenna’s fifth book, she draws our attention to the flow and cycle of not the calendar year but the ancient agricultural year: holidays, celebrations, seasonal touchstones, and astronomical events that mark sacred turning points in the seasons. We can’t wait to tell you more!

Stay tuned here for more on Cold Antler Farm, or visit Jenna at home here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s